A conceptual framework to understand teachers’ Professional Dispositions and Orientation towards tablet technology in secondary schools

Suzanne Sackstein, Lynne Slonimsky

Abstract


While recent technological innovations have resulted in calls to incorporate tablets into the classroom, schools have been criticised for not taking advantage of what the technology has to offer. Past research has shown that teachers do not automatically choose to adopt technology in the classroom. A number of concerns exist in relation to the research being conducted within this area. Firstly, the majority of research studies have not been based on sound conceptual frameworks. Secondly, for the most part, these research studies have tended to focus on the technology itself rather than the resulting changes in teaching and learning. Finally, much of the literature is premised on constructivist pedagogic practices which offer promissories of radical pedagogic change. An understanding of technology teachers’ orientations to the new technology, coupled with an understanding of the reasons behind teachers’ choices to adopt or not adopt technology has not yet been fully explored. From a review of the literature in relation to teachers’ Professional Dispositions, derived from the work of Bernstein on the pedagogic discourse, alongside Hooper and Rieber’s model on educational technology adoption a conceptual framework has been developed to will shed light on secondary school teachers’ differential adoption of tablet technology.

Keywords


Educational Technology; Tablet Technology; Professional Disposition; Orientation towards Tablet Technology; Pedagogical Discourse; Technology Adoption; Secondary Education

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.18489/sacj.v29i2.469

Copyright (c) 2017 Suzanne Sackstein, Lynne Slonimsky

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